dique.

Ask me anything  

dique—word dominicans esp. in nyc use to mean “supposedly” or “not even."

rafa. bronx.afrolatina.feminista.


urban-s0ul:


urban-s0ul:

I’ve been waiting for this..
1968 Olympic Black Power Salute. 

always reblog

urban-s0ul:

urban-s0ul:

I’ve been waiting for this..

1968 Olympic Black Power Salute. 

always reblog

(Source: bloggingisnotwriting, via jamfierce)

— 2 days ago with 120468 notes

carol-on:

Danai Gurira, Entertainment Weekly photo shoot, 9/5/14 issue

(via khromejio)

— 4 days ago with 102 notes

howtobeterrell:

todayinhistory:

August 28th 1955: Emmett Till murdered

On this day in 1955, the 14-year-old African-American boy Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi. While visiting family in the state, Till allegedly flirted with the young white shopkeeper Carolyn Bryant while buying candy. Bryant told her husband and a few nights later he and his half-brother abducted Till and brutally tortured and murdered him. His mutilated body was found three days later in the Tallahatchie river; Till’s face was unrecognisable, but he was identified by the ring he wore engraved with his father’s initials that his mother gave him before he left for Mississppi. The viciousness of this unprovoked, racially-motivated crime sent shockwaves throughout the nation. The case drew attention to the oppression of African-Americans throughout the nation and provided a name and a face to the threat of lynching. Till’s mother Mamie, a highly educated woman who went on to become a devoted fighter for African-American equality, insisted on an open-casket funeral in order to show the world what was done to her young son. Thousands attended the funeral and thousands more saw the horrific images of Till’s body. Due to the fierce reactions the murder had engendered it was a particularly painful, but sadly expected, outcome when the all-white jury in Mississippi acquitted Till’s killers, despite Till’s great-uncle openly identifying them in court. A few months later the killers, now protected by double jeopardy laws, sold their story to Look magazine and openly confessed to the murder in chilling detail. Taking place a year after the Supreme Court outlawed school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, the outrage over the murder galvanised the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement. 100 days after Emmett Till’s murder Rosa Parks, on her way back from a rally for Till hosted by the then-unknown Martin Luther King Jr., refused to give up her seat for a white man on an Alabama bus. This sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, thus beginning the movement that would result in the dismantling of the system of Jim Crow segregation and win successes in promoting African-American social and political equality.

This is super depressing in light of Mike Brown

— 5 days ago with 9534 notes
#Emmett till  #racism  #amerikkka  #michael brown  #ferguson  #white supremacy 
ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

(via anything-for-selenas)

— 5 days ago with 21044 notes
#rape culture  #tw: rape  #TRUTHHHHH  #feminism  #patriarchy  #fuck the patriarchy 

rafi-dangelo:

We’re not people really.  Our concerns are not America’s concerns.  We are just here for entertainment. We’re a convenient treasure trove of limitless creativity to be pillaged, watered down, and re-purposed for White audiences and the people getting rich from bastardized stereotypes and simplified caricatures of everything we bring to the table have nothing to say when shit gets really real.

(via rebeldementehonesta)

— 5 days ago with 30243 notes
#ferguson  #racism  #cultural appropriation  #black lives matter  #iggy azalea  #miley cyrus  #justin bieber  #white people 
gelopanda:

sourcedumal:

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman
1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.
2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”
4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.
5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poems, comic books, and films.
6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events. 

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.
But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


This woman is royalty for Black Americans and you cannot tell me otherwise.

There are people I know in their 80s and  90s like 100 years is not that long ago.

gelopanda:

sourcedumal:

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman

1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.

2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

Harriet_Tubman_Reward_Notice_1849.jpg

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”

4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.

5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poemscomic books, and films.

6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.

But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

This woman is royalty for Black Americans and you cannot tell me otherwise.

There are people I know in their 80s and 90s like 100 years is not that long ago.

— 5 days ago with 10073 notes
#Harriet Tubman  #racism  #slavery  #never forget 

socialnetworkhell:

"Consensual sex" is just sex. To say that implies that there is such a thing as "non consensual sex", which there isn’t. That’s rape. That is what it needs to be called. There is only sex or rape. Do not teach people that rape is just another type of sex. They are two very separate events. You wouldn’t say "breathing swimming" and "non breathing swimming", you say swimming and drowning.

(via khromejio)

— 6 days ago with 260469 notes
#tw: rape  #patriarchy  #tw: sexual assault  #consent is mandatory  #sex  #rape culture 
dead-girls-do-not-cry:

You are the whole world for someone.

dead-girls-do-not-cry:

You are the whole world for someone.

(Source: weheartit.com, via pursuitofhappy-ness)

— 1 week ago with 9012 notes
http://pursuitofhappy-ness.tumblr.com/post/95730474220/i-woke-up-today-and-looked-at-one-of-the-walls-in →

pursuitofhappy-ness:

I woke up today and looked at one of the walls in my house that my mom has full of pictures of us and saw my older sister kindergarten certificate framed.
I see this everyday but it really hit me. How my mom put all her dreams, goals, and aspirations in us 3. She had dreams of her own but knew…

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#mama uribe  #immigration  #immigrant experience  #first generation  #a mothers love